Dane Lewis

About Dane Lewis

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So far Dane Lewis has created 438 blog entries.

Bet You Didn’t Know

My seven most favorite quotes on research (honestly, how many good quotes on research can there be?): "Without data, you're just another person with an opinion." (W. Edwards Deming) "Research is what I'm doing when I don't know what I'm doing." (Wernher von Braun) “If we knew what we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?” (Albert Einstein) “As for the future, your task is not to foresee it, but to enable it.” (Antoine de Saint-Exupéry) “It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data.” (Arthur Conan Doyle) "You'd be amazed how much research you can get done when you have no life whatsoever." (Ernest Cline) “Research is seeing what everybody else has seen and thinking what nobody else has thought.” (Albert Szent-Györgyi) Our book today is You Found Me by Rick Richardson (Inter-Varsity Press, 2019). As books go, it’s fine. It’s not To Kill

A Failed Disciple and a Gift of Grace

This sermon is based on John 21:15-19. You can also view each week's sermon/worship service on our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5ncsq_QNvCv61bIwKUpP5A SERIES OVERVIEW: Usually, when we say that a person is an individual after our own heart, it is because we have seen similarities to things that we enjoy. A man who loves coffee is a man after my own heart. A woman who loves movies is a woman after my own heart. Anyone who loves big dogs is a person after my own heart. But is Jesus a man after my own heart? Or more to the point: Is he a man after your own heart? In all honesty, I am not so sure that Jesus and I have that much in common. Don’t get me wrong, I really, really like Jesus and I am so thankful for all that he has done for me; but if hard pressed, I am

Listen to That Great Question

Before reading this post, answer the following questions: (1) Your favorite movie, (2) your favorite classic book, (3) your favorite Netflix series, (4) your favorite historical figure you would like to meet, and (5) your favorite Christian discipline and book on that discipline.  Okay, here are my answers: Favorite movie: Has to be Casablanca (you just can’t beat Bogie) Favorite Classic book: The Three Musketeers (Jo read it out loud as we driving back home after our honeymoon – I think Dumas had just finished writing it) Favorite Netflix series: The Last Kingdom (Someday, I’ll name a dog, Uhtred) Favorite historical figure: Søren “we Christians are a bunch of scheming swindlers” Kierkegaard  Favorite Christian discipline: anything but evangelism! When I first became a church planter, I had great hopes that I would become a really great evangelist. It didn’t happen. Now, I feel I am really good at outreach when

A Sinful Woman with a Gift of Love

This sermon introduces our new  sermon series and is based on Luke 7:36-50. You can also view each week's sermon/worship service on our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5ncsq_QNvCv61bIwKUpP5A SERIES OVERVIEW: Usually, when we say that a person is an individual after our own heart, it is because we have seen similarities to things that we enjoy. A man who loves coffee is a man after my own heart. A woman who loves movies is a woman after my own heart. Anyone who loves big dogs is a person after my own heart. But is Jesus a man after my own heart? Or more to the point: Is he a man after your own heart? In all honesty, I am not so sure that Jesus and I have that much in common. Don’t get me wrong, I really, really like Jesus and I am so thankful for all that he has done for me;

The Five Moments

What’s the worst movie sequel title ever? Everyone agrees that these were some of the worst:  Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel Speed Two: Cruise Control I Still Know What You Did Last Summer (and as if it couldn’t get worse. . . .) I’ll Always Know What You Did Last Summer  Son of the Mask Air Bud: Seventh-Inning Fetch Knack 2: The Knacker All right, the last one is not a movie sequel. It is the name of this blog series. Thinking back on it, I’m not sure I could have chosen a worse name. In any case, here we are with, “The Knacker.” In case you missed it, this blog series is a sequel to our recent sermon series at River’s Edge, “Developing a Knack to Share.” In this blog series, I hope to add a more practical dimension to our previous conversations and provide some hands-on ideas

The Knack of Sharing the Gospel, Part 3

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 5:18-21. You can also view each week's sermon/worship service on our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5ncsq_QNvCv61bIwKUpP5A SERIES OVERVIEW: Let’s be honest: for most of us, the idea of sharing the good news of Jesus with our friends is really bad news. Talking about spiritual issues with those around us is a sure way to lose friends and annoy people. But again and again, we are called to be Jesus’ witnesses to those around us (I know, that’s more bad news). But what if we could develop a skill (what some may call a “knack”) that makes witnessing less of a chore and more of a relationship? What if evangelism wasn’t trying to get someone to sign on the dotted line, but rather, loving the people God puts in our path? And what if we could learn these skills so that we could have a knack

The Knack of Sharing the Gospel, Part 2

This sermon is based on Acts 3:12-21. You can also view each week's sermon/worship service on our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5ncsq_QNvCv61bIwKUpP5A SERIES OVERVIEW: Let’s be honest: for most of us, the idea of sharing the good news of Jesus with our friends is really bad news. Talking about spiritual issues with those around us is a sure way to lose friends and annoy people. But again and again, we are called to be Jesus’ witnesses to those around us (I know, that’s more bad news). But what if we could develop a skill (what some may call a “knack”) that makes witnessing less of a chore and more of a relationship? What if evangelism wasn’t trying to get someone to sign on the dotted line, but rather, loving the people God puts in our path? And what if we could learn these skills so that we could have a knack of

The Knack of Sharing the Gospel

This sermon is based on 1 Corinthians 5:1-5, 20-28. You can also view each week's sermon/worship service on our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5ncsq_QNvCv61bIwKUpP5A SERIES OVERVIEW: Let’s be honest: for most of us, the idea of sharing the good news of Jesus with our friends is really bad news. Talking about spiritual issues with those around us is a sure way to lose friends and annoy people. But again and again, we are called to be Jesus’ witnesses to those around us (I know, that’s more bad news). But what if we could develop a skill (what some may call a “knack”) that makes witnessing less of a chore and more of a relationship? What if evangelism wasn’t trying to get someone to sign on the dotted line, but rather, loving the people God puts in our path? And what if we could learn these skills so that we could have a

The Knack of Blessing Others

This sermon is based on Matthew 5:14-16. You can also view each week's sermon/worship service on our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5ncsq_QNvCv61bIwKUpP5A SERIES OVERVIEW: Let’s be honest: for most of us, the idea of sharing the good news of Jesus with our friends is really bad news. Talking about spiritual issues with those around us is a sure way to lose friends and annoy people. But again and again, we are called to be Jesus’ witnesses to those around us (I know, that’s more bad news). But what if we could develop a skill (what some may call a “knack”) that makes witnessing less of a chore and more of a relationship? What if evangelism wasn’t trying to get someone to sign on the dotted line, but rather, loving the people God puts in our path? And what if we could learn these skills so that we could have a knack of

The Knack of Having Spiritual Conversations

This sermon is based on Colossians 4:2-6. You can also view each week's sermon/worship service on our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5ncsq_QNvCv61bIwKUpP5A SERIES OVERVIEW: Let’s be honest: for most of us, the idea of sharing the good news of Jesus with our friends is really bad news. Talking about spiritual issues with those around us is a sure way to lose friends and annoy people. But again and again, we are called to be Jesus’ witnesses to those around us (I know, that’s more bad news). But what if we could develop a skill (what some may call a “knack”) that makes witnessing less of a chore and more of a relationship? What if evangelism wasn’t trying to get someone to sign on the dotted line, but rather, loving the people God puts in our path? And what if we could learn these skills so that we could have a knack of

Knack One: Prayer

We begin our summer teaching series this week, "Developing a Knack to Share." This introductory sermon is based on Acts 4:23-31. You can also view each week's sermon/worship service on our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5ncsq_QNvCv61bIwKUpP5A SERIES OVERVIEW: Let’s be honest: for most of us, the idea of sharing the good news of Jesus with our friends is really bad news. Talking about spiritual issues with those around us is a sure way to lose friends and annoy people. But again and again, we are called to be Jesus’ witnesses to those around us (I know, that’s more bad news). But what if we could develop a skill (what some may call a “knack”) that makes witnessing less of a chore and more of a relationship? What if evangelism wasn’t trying to get someone to sign on the dotted line, but rather, loving the people God puts in our path? And what

What Do We Do with the Pharisees?

Let’s face it, everything we have seen in this series leads to this one conclusion: the Pharisees are an enigma.  Matthew tells us they are the bad guys. Just read Matthew 3, 9, 12, 15, 16, 19, 22 and especially Matthew 23; and you will conclude exactly that. After all, they were hypocrites who were only in it for their own glory. And that sentiment is not only in Matthew; it’s in Mark, Luke and John, as well. But then we see other passages. The Pharisees warn Jesus that Herod is after him. They invite Jesus into their homes for a meal. They came to Jesus at night. A Pharisee was there at Jesus’ burial. Paul was/is a Pharisee. And history informs us that there were many other good things about the Pharisees.  So, maybe the Pharisees weren’t so bad.  But let’s be honest. It would take a whole lot

What’s Wrong with This Pharisee?

What’s wrong with this picture? Robert Shurtleff (1760-1827) was a former indentured servant who enlisted in the Continental Army to fight against the British in the Revolutionary War. As a member of the Fourth Massachusetts Regiment, Robert served with distinction. He acted as a scout behind enemy lines in New York. He led an attack against a Tory force and captured 15 enemy soldiers. And at Yorktown, while enduring heavy cannon fire, he stormed a British redoubt. His heroism was not lost on his friends, even though they often made fun of him for his boyish good looks (they even called him “Molly” because he could not grow a beard). During his time of service, he was wounded twice. He received a deep gash on his forehead from a British sword and was shot in the thigh (he removed the pistol ball from his leg by himself). However, in 1783,

The Revolution of Grace Makes Us Gracious

This sermon is based on Galatians 6:9-10. You can also view each week's sermon/worship service on our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5ncsq_QNvCv61bIwKUpP5A SERIES OVERVIEW: At River’s Edge, we talk a lot about grace. We talk about saving grace, amazing grace, irresistible grace, unconditional grace, common grace, pure grace, unmerited grace, enabling grace, sacrificial grace, sustaining grace, superabundant grace, and marvelous, infinite, matchless grace. And we warn about cheap grace, falls from grace and children who were not born on Tuesday (because only Tuesday’s child is full of grace). But talk, like some forms of grace, is cheap. And sometimes, we use the word without knowing exactly what it means or how it works itself out in our lives. And sometimes, we forget how revolutionary grace was back then and how revolutionary it is today! In this series, we want to look at how grace changes everything--our puny definitions, our misunderstandings, our limited

Another Good Pharisee, Part 2

I would like to tell you that these are my favorite quotes about lying, but that would probably be a lie; but it sure sounds better than “here are ten quotes of limited appeal.” “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.” – Winston Churchill “A truth that's told with bad intent, beats all the lies you can invent.” ― William Blake “I lie to myself all the time. But I never believe me.” ― S.E. Hinton “Better to get hurt by the truth than comforted with a lie.” ― Khaled Hosseini “The secret of staying young is to live honestly, eat slowly, and lie about your age.” –Lucille Ball “We're all islands shouting lies to each other across seas of misunderstanding.” ― Rudyard Kipling “I always tell the truth. Even when I lie.” ― Al Pacino “We lie loudest when we lie to ourselves.”

The Revolution of Grace Bears Fruit, Part 3

This sermon is based on Galatians 5:22-26. You can also view each week's sermon/worship service on our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5ncsq_QNvCv61bIwKUpP5A SERIES OVERVIEW: At River’s Edge, we talk a lot about grace. We talk about saving grace, amazing grace, irresistible grace, unconditional grace, common grace, pure grace, unmerited grace, enabling grace, sacrificial grace, sustaining grace, superabundant grace, and marvelous, infinite, matchless grace. And we warn about cheap grace, falls from grace and children who were not born on Tuesday (because only Tuesday’s child is full of grace). But talk, like some forms of grace, is cheap. And sometimes, we use the word without knowing exactly what it means or how it works itself out in our lives. And sometimes, we forget how revolutionary grace was back then and how revolutionary it is today! In this series, we want to look at how grace changes everything--our puny definitions, our misunderstandings, our limited

Another Good Pharisee

If you are a certain age, you will remember this commercial. Dressed in buckskins and wearing a feather, a weathered-faced native American paddles down a scenic river.  At first, it’s a beautiful scene, but it changes quickly. We see that the river has trash floating in it. The camera pulls back; and now, we see smokestacks belching out pollution. Our friend beaches his canoe on some trash-filled shoreline and takes a few steps. The vista is disgusting—a highway of cars and grime and smog. A narrator says: “Some people have a deep abiding respect for the natural beauty that was once this country. And some people don’t.” In case you missed it, the “some people” here who do definitely include native Americans. As the narration continues, a passing car throws a large bag of trash out of its window. The bag splatters at the feet of our native American friend

The Revolution of Grace Bears Fruit, Part 2

This sermon is based on Galatians 5:22-26. You can also view each week's sermon/worship service on our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5ncsq_QNvCv61bIwKUpP5A SERIES OVERVIEW: At River’s Edge, we talk a lot about grace. We talk about saving grace, amazing grace, irresistible grace, unconditional grace, common grace, pure grace, unmerited grace, enabling grace, sacrificial grace, sustaining grace, superabundant grace, and marvelous, infinite, matchless grace. And we warn about cheap grace, falls from grace and children who were not born on Tuesday (because only Tuesday’s child is full of grace). But talk, like some forms of grace, is cheap. And sometimes, we use the word without knowing exactly what it means or how it works itself out in our lives. And sometimes, we forget how revolutionary grace was back then and how revolutionary it is today! In this series, we want to look at how grace changes everything--our puny definitions, our misunderstandings, our limited

The Good Pharisees, Part 2

There are a lot of songs with the word “good” in the title. Off the top of your head, how many can you name? If you were on your game, you probably would have mentioned some of the following songs: “Good Vibrations” (The Beach Boys), “Only the Good Die Young” (Billy Joel), “Good Day Sunshine” or “Good Morning, Good Morning” (The Beatles), “You’re No Good” (Linda Ronstadt), “Good Riddance” – aka, “Time of Your Life” (Green Day), “Good Lovin’” (The Rascals),”Good Enough” (Evanescence), “Good Golly, Miss Molly” (Creedence Clearwater Revival), “Good Girl Gone Bad” (Rihanna) and of course, “Good King Wenceslas.” And if you got even four of those names, good for you! But of course, if you got less than three titles, let’s face it, “You’re no good, you’re no good, you’re no good, baby you’re no good.” Now, if you named the theme from the movie, “The Good,

The Revolution of Grace Bears Fruit, Part 1

This sermon is based on Galatians 5:22-26. You can also view each week's sermon/worship service on our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5ncsq_QNvCv61bIwKUpP5A SERIES OVERVIEW: At River’s Edge, we talk a lot about grace. We talk about saving grace, amazing grace, irresistible grace, unconditional grace, common grace, pure grace, unmerited grace, enabling grace, sacrificial grace, sustaining grace, superabundant grace, and marvelous, infinite, matchless grace. And we warn about cheap grace, falls from grace and children who were not born on Tuesday (because only Tuesday’s child is full of grace). But talk, like some forms of grace, is cheap. And sometimes, we use the word without knowing exactly what it means or how it works itself out in our lives. And sometimes, we forget how revolutionary grace was back then and how revolutionary it is today! In this series, we want to look at how grace changes everything--our puny definitions, our misunderstandings, our limited

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