Dane Lewis

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So far Dane Lewis has created 84 blog entries.

The Peace of Gratitude

This sermon is based on Colossians 3:15-17. Series Overview: Stanley Beamish didn’t have anything going for him. He was weak, afraid and rather pathetic. But all that changed when he took the “power pill” and he became, “Mr. Terrific,” a superhero with the strength of a thousand men (if you don’t remember this show, there may be good reason: it wasn’t so terrific). The Greatest American Hero was basically a nobody until he put on the suit; and then he became, well, the Greatest American Hero (and a great answering machine message). The “Limitless” guy was just plain and ordinary until he gained access to his brain’s full capacity (and semi-superhero status). How? By taking a secret pill. Here’s my question: what could we do to be transformed into something rather extraordinary? The answer is rather startling: It’s gratitude. See, gratitude changes us. It not only gives us a “super” perspective on life, but it also gives us a

The Gratitude Initiative

This sermon is based on 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18. Series Overview: Stanley Beamish didn’t have anything going for him. He was weak, afraid and rather pathetic. But all that changed when he took the “power pill” and he became, “Mr. Terrific,” a superhero with the strength of a thousand men (if you don’t remember this show, there may be good reason: it wasn’t so terrific). The Greatest American Hero was basically a nobody until he put on the suit; and then he became, well, the Greatest American Hero (and a great answering machine message). The “Limitless” guy was just plain and ordinary until he gained access to his brain’s full capacity (and semi-superhero status). How? By taking a secret pill. Here’s my question: what could we do to be transformed into something rather extraordinary? The answer is rather startling: It’s gratitude. See, gratitude changes us. It not only gives us a “super” perspective on life, but it also gives us

By | 2017-11-26T00:38:59+00:00 November 19th, 2017|Categories: A Peace of Gratitude, Sermon|Tags: , , |

State of the Ministry Message 2017

As we celebrate our church's 15th anniversary, it is a good time to reflect on all that God has done in our midst as well as consider the challenge from God's Word for the year ahead. This sermon is our annual "State of the Ministry Message 2017" based on 1 Corinthians 15:58. Series Overview: Stanley Beamish didn’t have anything going for him. He was weak, afraid and rather pathetic. But all that changed when he took the “power pill” and he became, “Mr. Terrific,” a superhero with the strength of a thousand men (if you don’t remember this show, there may be good reason: it wasn’t so terrific). The Greatest American Hero was basically a nobody until he put on the suit; and then he became, well, the Greatest American Hero (and a great answering machine message). The “Limitless” guy was just plain and ordinary until he gained access to his brain’s full

By | 2017-11-15T23:09:01+00:00 November 12th, 2017|Categories: A Peace of Gratitude, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

Gratitude and Peace Together

  This introductory sermon sets the stage for seeing the connection between gratitude and peace based on Philippians 4:6-7. Series Overview: Stanley Beamish didn’t have anything going for him. He was weak, afraid and rather pathetic. But all that changed when he took the “power pill” and he became, “Mr. Terrific,” a superhero with the strength of a thousand men (if you don’t remember this show, there may be good reason: it wasn’t so terrific). The Greatest American Hero was basically a nobody until he put on the suit; and then he became, well, the Greatest American Hero (and a great answering machine message). The “Limitless” guy was just plain and ordinary until he gained access to his brain’s full capacity (and semi-superhero status). How? By taking a secret pill. Here’s my question: what could we do to be transformed into something rather extraordinary? The answer is rather startling: It’s gratitude. See, gratitude changes us. It not only gives us

By | 2017-11-15T22:58:39+00:00 November 5th, 2017|Categories: A Peace of Gratitude, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

Always Reforming–The Church

May we commit ourselves to growth and health as a church as we consider together Hebrews 10:19-25. SERIES OVERVIEW: Jodocus van Lodenstein is not a name you hear bantered around at parties a lot, partly because he died in the 1600’s and partly because Jodocus sounds made-up; but he was the first to capture the true calling of the church in every age. After the Reformation, a lifeless faith took hold of most of England and the Netherlands. People loved the teachings of the Reformation (they even named the “Tulip” flower after these teachings), but they had little interest in applying the doctrines of grace to their lives. But Jodocus called the church to an invigorated spirituality rooted in the Word of God. He even created a slogan to remind people of our calling: “The church is Reformed and always in need of being reformed according to the Word of God.” We can also

By | 2017-11-04T11:33:22+00:00 October 29th, 2017|Categories: Always Reforming, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

Always Reforming–Culture

This sermon helps us understand a godly perspective on what Jesus meant about being "in the world, but not of it" so that we are engaged in transforming culture for His glory. It is based on 1 Peter 2:11-17. SERIES OVERVIEW: Jodocus van Lodenstein is not a name you hear bantered around at parties a lot, partly because he died in the 1600’s and partly because Jodocus sounds made-up; but he was the first to capture the true calling of the church in every age. After the Reformation, a lifeless faith took hold of most of England and the Netherlands. People loved the teachings of the Reformation (they even named the “Tulip” flower after these teachings), but they had little interest in applying the doctrines of grace to their lives. But Jodocus called the church to an invigorated spirituality rooted in the Word of God. He even created a slogan to remind people of

By | 2017-10-18T10:38:26+00:00 October 15th, 2017|Categories: Always Reforming, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

Always Reforming–Ourselves, Part 2

This sermon is based on Luke 9:23-24, 57-62. SERIES OVERVIEW: Jodocus van Lodenstein is not a name you hear bantered around at parties a lot, partly because he died in the 1600’s and partly because Jodocus sounds made-up; but he was the first to capture the true calling of the church in every age. After the Reformation, a lifeless faith took hold of most of England and the Netherlands. People loved the teachings of the Reformation (they even named the “Tulip” flower after these teachings), but they had little interest in applying the doctrines of grace to their lives. But Jodocus called the church to an invigorated spirituality rooted in the Word of God. He even created a slogan to remind people of our calling: “The church is Reformed and always in need of being reformed according to the Word of God.” We can also say it this way (with apologies to Emile Coue):

By | 2017-10-18T10:39:40+00:00 October 8th, 2017|Categories: Always Reforming, Sermon|Tags: , , |

Always Reforming–Ourselves

This first sermon in our series reminds us how important it is to be "always reforming" ourselves into the image of Christ and is based on Philippians 3:12-14. SERIES OVERVIEW: Jodocus van Lodenstein is not a name you hear bantered around at parties a lot, partly because he died in the 1600’s and partly because Jodocus sounds made-up; but he was the first to capture the true calling of the church in every age. After the Reformation, a lifeless faith took hold of most of England and the Netherlands. People loved the teachings of the Reformation (they even named the “Tulip” flower after these teachings), but they had little interest in applying the doctrines of grace to their lives. But Jodocus called the church to an invigorated spirituality rooted in the Word of God. He even created a slogan to remind people of our calling: “The church is Reformed and always in need of

By | 2017-10-18T10:31:13+00:00 October 1st, 2017|Categories: Always Reforming, Sermon|Tags: , , |

A Door of Unbelievable Developments Has Opened

We were privileged to have Stephen and Susan Beck, our missionaries in Germany, in our worship service. Stephen opened God's Word to us from 1 Corinthians 16:5-9, and they both shared powerfully about the amazing things God is doing in their midst this year. SERIES OVERVIEW: From day one we’ve said that missions are at the heart of our church. And you can see all sorts of ways this idea has shaped our church (the budget, missionary updates, missions conferences, short-term mission trips, international ministries, etc.). But how does it shape us? How should we be different? I would argue that it should change us leaps and bounds (but more on “leaps” later).  After all, it changed me. I used to HATE missions. I used to think missions were boring (and missionaries were even worse than that). And then a funny thing happened. I went on a mission trip, and it changed my life (okay, I was forced to go on this trip on pain of

By | 2017-10-18T10:24:02+00:00 September 24th, 2017|Categories: Everyday Missions, Sermon|Tags: , , |

The LEAPS

This second sermon in the series introduces the acrostic "LEAPS" as a way to understand our "everyday mission" and is based on Psalm 108:1-5. L - Live as light E - Engage in what God is doing A - Align with God's Kingdom purposes P - Pray for God's glory S - Share with others about God's Kingdom reign SERIES OVERVIEW: From day one we’ve said that missions are at the heart of our church. And you can see all sorts of ways this idea has shaped our church (the budget, missionary updates, missions conferences, short-term mission trips, international ministries, etc.). But how does it shape us? How should we be different? I would argue that it should change us leaps and bounds (but more on “leaps” later).  After all, it changed me. I used to HATE missions. I used to think missions were boring (and missionaries were even worse than that). And then a funny thing happened. I went on a mission

By | 2017-10-18T10:15:33+00:00 September 17th, 2017|Categories: Everyday Missions, Sermon|Tags: , |

Everyday Missions

From day one we’ve said that missions are at the heart of our church. And you can see all sorts of ways this idea has shaped our church (the budget, missionary updates, missions conferences, short-term mission trips, international ministries, etc.). But how does it shape us? How should we be different? I would argue that it should change us leaps and bounds (but more on “leaps” later).  After all, it changed me. I used to HATE missions. I used to think missions were boring (and missionaries were even worse than that). And then a funny thing happened. I went on a mission trip, and it changed my life (okay, I was forced to go on this trip on pain of being fired, but I still went!). Bottom line: If I can have a change of heart about missions, anyone can! And maybe the first step to change is understanding the five commitments found in “leaps.” Join us in what should be an exciting study of God’s

By | 2017-10-18T10:08:45+00:00 September 10th, 2017|Categories: Everyday Missions, Sermon|Tags: , |

Going Off on Nineveh, Part 2

This sermon continues to explore Jonah's hatred for Nineveh and how it was steeped in nationalism and racism, much in the same way we are guilty of these same sins in our own lives and churches today, based on Jonah 3:10, 4:1. I can remember the first time I heard the story of Jonah.  After I heard the story, I didn’t go swimming for weeks. Oh, wait that was Jaws.  Now, I remember the story.  The whale ate Jonah, and he became a real boy.  Oh wait, that was Pinocchio.  Maybe I don’t remember the real story of Jonah as well as I thought!  All I have is images of the Veggietales version with Archibald Asparagus as Jonah (I would have gone with Bob the Cucumber myself).  And I bet I am not alone.  Ask anyone—they would tell you that Jonah is a fish story and one that is very hard to swallow, at

By | 2017-09-30T22:17:33+00:00 July 9th, 2017|Categories: A Whale of a Prophet, Sermon|Tags: , , , , , |

Going Off on Nineveh

This sermon discusses Jonah's hatred of Nineveh, based on Jonah 1:1-3. I can remember the first time I heard the story of Jonah.  After I heard the story, I didn’t go swimming for weeks. Oh, wait that was Jaws.  Now, I remember the story.  The whale ate Jonah, and he became a real boy.  Oh wait, that was Pinocchio.  Maybe I don’t remember the real story of Jonah as well as I thought!  All I have is images of the Veggietales version with Archibald Asparagus as Jonah (I would have gone with Bob the Cucumber myself).  And I bet I am not alone.  Ask anyone—they would tell you that Jonah is a fish story and one that is very hard to swallow, at that!  And as a result, we just don’t take these forty-eight verses very seriously (when was the last time you saw the Veggietales version of Hosea?).  But Jonah is a masterpiece of a

By | 2017-07-12T09:20:03+00:00 July 2nd, 2017|Categories: A Whale of a Prophet, Sermon|Tags: , , |

Fresh Off the Boat

This sermon discusses Jonah's prayer from inside the big fish, based on Jonah 1:1-10. I can remember the first time I heard the story of Jonah.  After I heard the story, I didn’t go swimming for weeks. Oh, wait that was Jaws.  Now, I remember the story.  The whale ate Jonah, and he became a real boy.  Oh wait, that was Pinocchio.  Maybe I don’t remember the real story of Jonah as well as I thought!  All I have is images of the Veggietales version with Archibald Asparagus as Jonah (I would have gone with Bob the Cucumber myself).  And I bet I am not alone.  Ask anyone—they would tell you that Jonah is a fish story and one that is very hard to swallow, at that!  And as a result, we just don’t take these forty-eight verses very seriously (when was the last time you saw the Veggietales version of Hosea?).  But Jonah is a

By | 2017-07-12T09:20:45+00:00 June 25th, 2017|Categories: A Whale of a Prophet, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

Running Off

This sermon discusses Jonah's request that the sailors throw him overboard in order to calm the storm, as well as the remarkable indication of the sailors' faith, based on Jonah 1:8-17. I can remember the first time I heard the story of Jonah.  After I heard the story, I didn’t go swimming for weeks. Oh, wait that was Jaws.  Now, I remember the story.  The whale ate Jonah, and he became a real boy.  Oh wait, that was Pinocchio.  Maybe I don’t remember the real story of Jonah as well as I thought!  All I have is images of the Veggietales version with Archibald Asparagus as Jonah (I would have gone with Bob the Cucumber myself).  And I bet I am not alone.  Ask anyone—they would tell you that Jonah is a fish story and one that is very hard to swallow, at that!  And as a result, we just don’t take these forty-eight

By | 2017-07-12T09:21:50+00:00 June 18th, 2017|Categories: A Whale of a Prophet, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

Off to a Bad Start

This sermon discusses Jonah's decision to go to Tarshish instead of Nineveh as God had commanded him to do, based on Jonah 1:1-10. I can remember the first time I heard the story of Jonah.  After I heard the story, I didn’t go swimming for weeks. Oh, wait that was Jaws.  Now, I remember the story.  The whale ate Jonah, and he became a real boy.  Oh wait, that was Pinocchio.  Maybe I don’t remember the real story of Jonah as well as I thought!  All I have is images of the Veggietales version with Archibald Asparagus as Jonah (I would have gone with Bob the Cucumber myself).  And I bet I am not alone.  Ask anyone—they would tell you that Jonah is a fish story and one that is very hard to swallow, at that!  And as a result, we just don’t take these forty-eight verses very seriously (when was the last time

By | 2017-07-12T09:22:41+00:00 June 11th, 2017|Categories: A Whale of a Prophet, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

Off on the Wrong Foot

This first sermon of this series gives the background and context for how to examine the book of Jonah, based on Jonah 1:1-3. I can remember the first time I heard the story of Jonah.  After I heard the story, I didn’t go swimming for weeks. Oh, wait that was Jaws.  Now, I remember the story.  The whale ate Jonah, and he became a real boy.  Oh wait, that was Pinocchio.  Maybe I don’t remember the real story of Jonah as well as I thought!  All I have is images of the Veggietales version with Archibald Asparagus as Jonah (I would have gone with Bob the Cucumber myself).  And I bet I am not alone.  Ask anyone—they would tell you that Jonah is a fish story and one that is very hard to swallow, at that!  And as a result, we just don’t take these forty-eight verses very seriously (when was the last time

By | 2017-06-17T23:12:57+00:00 June 4th, 2017|Categories: A Whale of a Prophet, Sermon|Tags: , |

The Blessings and Dangers of Doubt, Part 2

This sermon explores the blessings and dangers of doubt (Part 2) and is based on Jude 20-25. Let's take a quiz.  Pick one.  Doubt is (a) the worst sin imaginable, (b) a terrible weakness that derails people's faith, (c) a great benefit and encouragement to our faith, or (d) an essential and necessary part of our faith.  Here's my advice: if you want to start an argument in a church, ask a question like that.  If I had to guess, most of us would argue that doubt is a bad thing, a really bad thing.  Want some proof?  Would any of us want our kids to have serious doubts about their faith? I didn't think so.  Some of us, on the other hand, believe that doubt, when applied properly, can actually strengthen our faith.  Want some proof?  Look at the faith of Doubting Thomas! So, what is the correct answer to

By | 2017-06-17T23:05:18+00:00 May 28th, 2017|Categories: Doubting Thomas' Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

The Blessings and Dangers of Doubt

This sermon explores the blessings and dangers of doubt and is based on Jude 17-23. Let's take a quiz.  Pick one.  Doubt is (a) the worst sin imaginable, (b) a terrible weakness that derails people's faith, (c) a great benefit and encouragement to our faith, or (d) an essential and necessary part of our faith.  Here's my advice: if you want to start an argument in a church, ask a question like that.  If I had to guess, most of us would argue that doubt is a bad thing, a really bad thing.  Want some proof?  Would any of us want our kids to have serious doubts about their faith? I didn't think so.  Some of us, on the other hand, believe that doubt, when applied properly, can actually strengthen our faith.  Want some proof?  Look at the faith of Doubting Thomas! So, what is the correct answer to the quiz? 

By | 2017-06-17T22:59:00+00:00 May 21st, 2017|Categories: Doubting Thomas' Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

Faith and Doubt

On this Mother's Day, our sermon examines the relationship between faith and doubt based on Matthew 13:53-58, using the faith of Jesus' mother, Mary, as our example. Let's take a quiz.  Pick one.  Doubt is (a) the worst sin imaginable, (b) a terrible weakness that derails people's faith, (c) a great benefit and encouragement to our faith, or (d) an essential and necessary part of our faith.  Here's my advice: if you want to start an argument in a church, ask a question like that.  If I had to guess, most of us would argue that doubt is a bad thing, a really bad thing.  Want some proof?  Would any of us want our kids to have serious doubts about their faith? I didn't think so.  Some of us, on the other hand, believe that doubt, when applied properly, can actually strengthen our faith.  Want some proof?  Look at the

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