Dane Lewis

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So far Dane Lewis has created 120 blog entries.

The Path into Jerusalem

This sermon is based on Luke 19:37-44. Series Overview: Choice: it is what makes life rich and interesting. YOU get to choose things that will determine your tomorrows.   But it is even more than that: “We are our choices” (Jean-Paul Sartre). Now sometimes, our choices are limited (sometimes by finances, sometimes by personal restrictions, and sometimes by a host of odd coincidences).  But think about what we could achieve if we had infinite possibilities, possibilities that we could actually materialize?  We could do almost anything and be almost anything. Now before we start claiming untapped and unlimited potential, let us change the focus from us to God.  God, being God, really could choose any path and actualize any possibility; but when it came to the incarnation, God chose the path of suffering, of rejection, of abandonment and of sorrow.   As hard as it is to grasp, Good Friday was always God’s first choice.  In this Lenten season, we want to consider the path Jesus chose to

The Path Jesus Chose

This sermon is based on Mark 6:47-52. Series Overview: Choice: it is what makes life rich and interesting. YOU get to choose things that will determine your tomorrows.   But it is even more than that: “We are our choices” (Jean-Paul Sartre). Now sometimes, our choices are limited (sometimes by finances, sometimes by personal restrictions, and sometimes by a host of odd coincidences).  But think about what we could achieve if we had infinite possibilities, possibilities that we could actually materialize?  We could do almost anything and be almost anything. Now before we start claiming untapped and unlimited potential, let us change the focus from us to God.  God, being God, really could choose any path and actualize any possibility; but when it came to the incarnation, God chose the path of suffering, of rejection, of abandonment and of sorrow.   As hard as it is to grasp, Good Friday was always God’s first choice.  In this Lenten season, we want to consider the path Jesus chose to

By |2018-03-24T23:30:44+00:00March 18th, 2018|Categories: Sermon, The Path Jesus Chose|Tags: , , , , |

A Way of Weakness, Part 3

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 13:5-6. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By |2018-03-17T23:18:50+00:00March 11th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

A Way of Weakness, Part 2

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 12:9-10. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By |2018-03-10T22:26:16+00:00March 4th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

A Way of Weakness, Part 1

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 12:1-10. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By |2018-02-27T23:19:35+00:00February 25th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

A Cross-Shaped Faith

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 11:21-33. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By |2018-02-25T00:17:34+00:00February 18th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

A Culture-Shaped Faith, Part 2

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 11:5-15. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By |2018-02-24T15:16:55+00:00February 11th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

A Culture-Shaped Faith, Part 1

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 11:1-4. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By |2018-02-24T15:18:33+00:00February 4th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

Proper Boasting

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 10:12-18. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By |2018-02-03T11:11:36+00:00January 28th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

Intruder Alert

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 10:1-13. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By |2018-01-17T19:10:05+00:00January 14th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

The Hope of Dwelling

This sermon is based on John 1:14-18. Series Overview: Christmasy -- it’s a word. It means “typical of Christmas” or “a special Christmas mood.” Christmas is a word, but it seems to have lost its meaning of late. Once, it meant a day of worship to celebrate God’s redemption of the world through the incarnation of Jesus, the Son. Now, it simply denotes a winter holiday filled with food, family, the airing of grievances and the giving of gifts (but not necessarily in that order). That’s why, this year, I’m choosing to use the word Christmasy more, but I want to mispronounce it. I like “Christmas –why” over “Christmas-ee” because it asks the right question: “Why is there a Christmas?” That’s the question we want to explore this Advent season. And it’s a funny thing, when you are all “Christmas-why,” you end up being all Christmasy because you will find the true meaning of Christmas.

By |2018-01-17T16:20:48+00:00December 31st, 2017|Categories: ChristmasY, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

The Hope of Christmas

This sermon is based on Isaiah 9:2-7. Series Overview: Christmasy -- it’s a word. It means “typical of Christmas” or “a special Christmas mood.” Christmas is a word, but it seems to have lost its meaning of late. Once, it meant a day of worship to celebrate God’s redemption of the world through the incarnation of Jesus, the Son. Now, it simply denotes a winter holiday filled with food, family, the airing of grievances and the giving of gifts (but not necessarily in that order). That’s why, this year, I’m choosing to use the word Christmasy more, but I want to mispronounce it. I like “Christmas –why” over “Christmas-ee” because it asks the right question: “Why is there a Christmas?” That’s the question we want to explore this Advent season. And it’s a funny thing, when you are all “Christmas-why,” you end up being all Christmasy because you will find the true meaning of Christmas.

By |2018-01-17T16:18:40+00:00December 24th, 2017|Categories: ChristmasY, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

That Mourns in Lonely Exile Here

This sermon is based on Matthew 2:16-18. Series Overview: Christmasy -- it’s a word. It means “typical of Christmas” or “a special Christmas mood.” Christmas is a word, but it seems to have lost its meaning of late. Once, it meant a day of worship to celebrate God’s redemption of the world through the incarnation of Jesus, the Son. Now, it simply denotes a winter holiday filled with food, family, the airing of grievances and the giving of gifts (but not necessarily in that order). That’s why, this year, I’m choosing to use the word Christmasy more, but I want to mispronounce it. I like “Christmas –why” over “Christmas-ee” because it asks the right question: “Why is there a Christmas?” That’s the question we want to explore this Advent season. And it’s a funny thing, when you are all “Christmas-why,” you end up being all Christmasy because you will find the true meaning of Christmas.

By |2018-01-17T16:14:22+00:00December 17th, 2017|Categories: ChristmasY, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

The Sin That Longed for Christmas

This sermon is based on Matthew 1:18-21. Series Overview: Christmasy -- it’s a word. It means “typical of Christmas” or “a special Christmas mood.” Christmas is a word, but it seems to have lost its meaning of late. Once, it meant a day of worship to celebrate God’s redemption of the world through the incarnation of Jesus, the Son. Now, it simply denotes a winter holiday filled with food, family, the airing of grievances and the giving of gifts (but not necessarily in that order). That’s why, this year, I’m choosing to use the word Christmasy more, but I want to mispronounce it. I like “Christmas –why” over “Christmas-ee” because it asks the right question: “Why is there a Christmas?” That’s the question we want to explore this Advent season. And it’s a funny thing, when you are all “Christmas-why,” you end up being all Christmasy because you will find the true meaning of Christmas.

By |2018-01-17T16:15:45+00:00December 10th, 2017|Categories: ChristmasY, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

The Love of Christmas

This sermon is based on 1 John 4:9-10. Series Overview: Christmasy -- it’s a word. It means “typical of Christmas” or “a special Christmas mood.” Christmas is a word, but it seems to have lost its meaning of late. Once, it meant a day of worship to celebrate God’s redemption of the world through the incarnation of Jesus, the Son. Now, it simply denotes a winter holiday filled with food, family, the airing of grievances and the giving of gifts (but not necessarily in that order). That’s why, this year, I’m choosing to use the word Christmasy more, but I want to mispronounce it. I like “Christmas –why” over “Christmas-ee” because it asks the right question: “Why is there a Christmas?” That’s the question we want to explore this Advent season. And it’s a funny thing, when you are all “Christmas-why,” you end up being all Christmasy because you will find the true meaning of Christmas.

By |2018-01-17T16:08:00+00:00December 3rd, 2017|Categories: ChristmasY, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

The Peace of Gratitude

This sermon is based on Colossians 3:15-17. Series Overview: Stanley Beamish didn’t have anything going for him. He was weak, afraid and rather pathetic. But all that changed when he took the “power pill” and he became, “Mr. Terrific,” a superhero with the strength of a thousand men (if you don’t remember this show, there may be good reason: it wasn’t so terrific). The Greatest American Hero was basically a nobody until he put on the suit; and then he became, well, the Greatest American Hero (and a great answering machine message). The “Limitless” guy was just plain and ordinary until he gained access to his brain’s full capacity (and semi-superhero status). How? By taking a secret pill. Here’s my question: what could we do to be transformed into something rather extraordinary? The answer is rather startling: It’s gratitude. See, gratitude changes us. It not only gives us a “super” perspective on life, but it also gives us a

The Gratitude Initiative

This sermon is based on 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18. Series Overview: Stanley Beamish didn’t have anything going for him. He was weak, afraid and rather pathetic. But all that changed when he took the “power pill” and he became, “Mr. Terrific,” a superhero with the strength of a thousand men (if you don’t remember this show, there may be good reason: it wasn’t so terrific). The Greatest American Hero was basically a nobody until he put on the suit; and then he became, well, the Greatest American Hero (and a great answering machine message). The “Limitless” guy was just plain and ordinary until he gained access to his brain’s full capacity (and semi-superhero status). How? By taking a secret pill. Here’s my question: what could we do to be transformed into something rather extraordinary? The answer is rather startling: It’s gratitude. See, gratitude changes us. It not only gives us a “super” perspective on life, but it also gives us

By |2017-11-26T00:38:59+00:00November 19th, 2017|Categories: A Peace of Gratitude, Sermon|Tags: , , |

State of the Ministry Message 2017

As we celebrate our church's 15th anniversary, it is a good time to reflect on all that God has done in our midst as well as consider the challenge from God's Word for the year ahead. This sermon is our annual "State of the Ministry Message 2017" based on 1 Corinthians 15:58. Series Overview: Stanley Beamish didn’t have anything going for him. He was weak, afraid and rather pathetic. But all that changed when he took the “power pill” and he became, “Mr. Terrific,” a superhero with the strength of a thousand men (if you don’t remember this show, there may be good reason: it wasn’t so terrific). The Greatest American Hero was basically a nobody until he put on the suit; and then he became, well, the Greatest American Hero (and a great answering machine message). The “Limitless” guy was just plain and ordinary until he gained access to his brain’s full

By |2017-11-15T23:09:01+00:00November 12th, 2017|Categories: A Peace of Gratitude, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

Gratitude and Peace Together

  This introductory sermon sets the stage for seeing the connection between gratitude and peace based on Philippians 4:6-7. Series Overview: Stanley Beamish didn’t have anything going for him. He was weak, afraid and rather pathetic. But all that changed when he took the “power pill” and he became, “Mr. Terrific,” a superhero with the strength of a thousand men (if you don’t remember this show, there may be good reason: it wasn’t so terrific). The Greatest American Hero was basically a nobody until he put on the suit; and then he became, well, the Greatest American Hero (and a great answering machine message). The “Limitless” guy was just plain and ordinary until he gained access to his brain’s full capacity (and semi-superhero status). How? By taking a secret pill. Here’s my question: what could we do to be transformed into something rather extraordinary? The answer is rather startling: It’s gratitude. See, gratitude changes us. It not only gives us

By |2017-11-15T22:58:39+00:00November 5th, 2017|Categories: A Peace of Gratitude, Sermon|Tags: , , , |
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