Moses and the Empire

This sermon is based on Exodus 2:11-22. SERIES OVERVIEW: The Exodus contains the stuff Hollywood moguls can only dream of (see DeMille’s The Ten Commandments; no, literally, see DeMille’s The Ten Commandments). You have a strong leading man who comes from nowhere to rescue his people and become the greatest leader of his people. Plus, he’s not squeaky clean (he did murder someone, but don’t we all have a few skeletons in our closets). You have a great villain who seems invincible (but he can’t grow hair). You have a desperate situation with pain and misery. You have strong women who save the day (Yeah, women!). You have miracles; and just like in all great movies, the villain arises from his defeat for one last deadly encounter (but this time, it’s personal!). And I haven’t even mentioned the plagues (sure, Ebola or the Black Death are bad, but how about

By |2019-07-10T16:52:23-04:00July 7th, 2019|Categories: Moses and the Ex, Sermon|Tags: , , , , , |

Moses

This sermon is based on Exodus 2:5-10, 23-25. SERIES OVERVIEW: The Exodus contains the stuff Hollywood moguls can only dream of (see DeMille’s The Ten Commandments; no, literally, see DeMille’s The Ten Commandments). You have a strong leading man who comes from nowhere to rescue his people and become the greatest leader of his people. Plus, he’s not squeaky clean (he did murder someone, but don’t we all have a few skeletons in our closets). You have a great villain who seems invincible (but he can’t grow hair). You have a desperate situation with pain and misery. You have strong women who save the day (Yeah, women!). You have miracles; and just like in all great movies, the villain arises from his defeat for one last deadly encounter (but this time, it’s personal!). And I haven’t even mentioned the plagues (sure, Ebola or the Black Death are bad, but how

By |2019-07-03T23:10:56-04:00June 30th, 2019|Categories: Moses and the Ex, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

Love from Beginning to End

This sermon is based on Jonah 3:6 – 4:3. SERIES OVERVIEW: Yogi Berra once famously said: “In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.” I think we would agree. We all love the idea of loving others. After all, love is the definitive distinctive of a disciple of Jesus; and it’s our most memorable mandate, our most important imperative, and our most dynamic and decisive decree. That’s why it is called the Greatest Commandment. So, there you have it. In theory we love it! But then there’s practice. And loving everyone, everywhere and all the time just doesn’t seem all that practical. Now, don’t get me wrong. We love it as an idea, and we love to love people who love us and who are lovable, but some people just don’t fit that description (maybe because we don’t know them or maybe because we’ve known

Love Your Dad

This sermon is based on Proverbs 4:1-9. SERIES OVERVIEW: Yogi Berra once famously said: “In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.” I think we would agree. We all love the idea of loving others. After all, love is the definitive distinctive of a disciple of Jesus; and it’s our most memorable mandate, our most important imperative, and our most dynamic and decisive decree. That’s why it is called the Greatest Commandment. So, there you have it. In theory we love it! But then there’s practice. And loving everyone, everywhere and all the time just doesn’t seem all that practical. Now, don’t get me wrong. We love it as an idea, and we love to love people who love us and who are lovable, but some people just don’t fit that description (maybe because we don’t know them or maybe because we’ve known them for

Love Your Enemies

This sermon is based on Romans 12:17-21. SERIES OVERVIEW: Yogi Berra once famously said: “In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.” I think we would agree. We all love the idea of loving others. After all, love is the definitive distinctive of a disciple of Jesus; and it’s our most memorable mandate, our most important imperative, and our most dynamic and decisive decree. That’s why it is called the Greatest Commandment. So, there you have it. In theory we love it! But then there’s practice. And loving everyone, everywhere and all the time just doesn’t seem all that practical. Now, don’t get me wrong. We love it as an idea, and we love to love people who love us and who are lovable, but some people just don’t fit that description (maybe because we don’t know them or maybe because we’ve known them for

Love One Another

This sermon is based on 1 John 4:7-12. SERIES OVERVIEW: Yogi Berra once famously said: “In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.” I think we would agree. We all love the idea of loving others. After all, love is the definitive distinctive of a disciple of Jesus; and it’s our most memorable mandate, our most important imperative, and our most dynamic and decisive decree. That’s why it is called the Greatest Commandment. So, there you have it. In theory we love it! But then there’s practice. And loving everyone, everywhere and all the time just doesn’t seem all that practical. Now, don’t get me wrong. We love it as an idea, and we love to love people who love us and who are lovable, but some people just don’t fit that description (maybe because we don’t know them or maybe because we’ve known them

Love the Stranger

This sermon is based on Zechariah 7:8-11 SERIES OVERVIEW: Yogi Berra once famously said: “In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.” I think we would agree. We all love the idea of loving others. After all, love is the definitive distinctive of a disciple of Jesus; and it’s our most memorable mandate, our most important imperative, and our most dynamic and decisive decree. That’s why it is called the Greatest Commandment. So, there you have it. In theory we love it! But then there’s practice. And loving everyone, everywhere and all the time just doesn’t seem all that practical. Now, don’t get me wrong. We love it as an idea, and we love to love people who love us and who are lovable, but some people just don’t fit that description (maybe because we don’t know them or maybe because we’ve known them for

Love Your Children

This sermon is based on Colossians 3:12-14. SERIES OVERVIEW: Yogi Berra once famously said: “In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.” I think we would agree. We all love the idea of loving others. After all, love is the definitive distinctive of a disciple of Jesus; and it’s our most memorable mandate, our most important imperative, and our most dynamic and decisive decree. That’s why it is called the Greatest Commandment. So, there you have it. In theory we love it! But then there’s practice. And loving everyone, everywhere and all the time just doesn’t seem all that practical. Now, don’t get me wrong. We love it as an idea, and we love to love people who love us and who are lovable, but some people just don’t fit that description (maybe because we don’t know them or maybe because we’ve known them for

Love Your Mom

This sermon is based on Luke 10:38-42. SERIES OVERVIEW: Yogi Berra once famously said: “In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.” I think we would agree. We all love the idea of loving others. After all, love is the definitive distinctive of a disciple of Jesus; and it’s our most memorable mandate, our most important imperative, and our most dynamic and decisive decree. That’s why it is called the Greatest Commandment. So, there you have it. In theory we love it! But then there’s practice. And loving everyone, everywhere and all the time just doesn’t seem all that practical. Now, don’t get me wrong. We love it as an idea, and we love to love people who love us and who are lovable, but some people just don’t fit that description (maybe because we don’t know them or maybe because we’ve known them for

Love Your Neighbor, Part 2

This sermon is based on Luke 10:25-37. SERIES OVERVIEW: Yogi Berra once famously said: “In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.” I think we would agree. We all love the idea of loving others. After all, love is the definitive distinctive of a disciple of Jesus; and it’s our most memorable mandate, our most important imperative, and our most dynamic and decisive decree. That’s why it is called the Greatest Commandment. So, there you have it. In theory we love it! But then there’s practice. And loving everyone, everywhere and all the time just doesn’t seem all that practical. Now, don’t get me wrong. We love it as an idea, and we love to love people who love us and who are lovable, but some people just don’t fit that description (maybe because we don’t know them or maybe because we’ve known them for

Love Your Neighbor

This sermon is based on Luke 10:25-37. SERIES OVERVIEW: Yogi Berra once famously said: “In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.” I think we would agree. We all love the idea of loving others. After all, love is the definitive distinctive of a disciple of Jesus; and it’s our most memorable mandate, our most important imperative, and our most dynamic and decisive decree. That’s why it is called the Greatest Commandment. So, there you have it. In theory we love it! But then there’s practice. And loving everyone, everywhere and all the time just doesn’t seem all that practical. Now, don’t get me wrong. We love it as an idea, and we love to love people who love us and who are lovable, but some people just don’t fit that description (maybe because we don’t know them or maybe because we’ve known them for

“The Story of Jesus (It’s a Story No One Was Expecting)”

This sermon is based on Mark 16:1-8. SERIES OVERVIEW: She wasn’t the brightest bulb on the tree, but she was trying to understand. She was trying to figure out who Jesus was. She knew he was born on Christmas and that he died on Good Friday and was raised on Easter Sunday.  Her problem was that she forgot that there were 30 years between those first two events! But she is not alone. While none of us would ever make that chronological mistake and have a five-month old savior going to the cross, we often overlook what Jesus was doing in his life. We know why he was born (incarnation). We know why he died (atonement). We know why he rose again (exaltation). We even know why he will return (restoration). But ask someone why Jesus lived, and they may stumble to find a concise answer.  For many of us,

By |2019-04-24T18:45:44-04:00April 21st, 2019|Categories: Sermon, The Story of Jesus|Tags: , , , , |

“The Story of Jesus (It’s a Story No One Was Expecting)”

This sermon is based on Matthew 21:6-13. SERIES OVERVIEW: She wasn’t the brightest bulb on the tree, but she was trying to understand. She was trying to figure out who Jesus was. She knew he was born on Christmas and that he died on Good Friday and was raised on Easter Sunday.  Her problem was that she forgot that there were 30 years between those first two events! But she is not alone. While none of us would ever make that chronological mistake and have a five-month old savior going to the cross, we often overlook what Jesus was doing in his life. We know why he was born (incarnation). We know why he died (atonement). We know why he rose again (exaltation). We even know why he will return (restoration). But ask someone why Jesus lived, and they may stumble to find a concise answer.  For many of us,

By |2019-04-17T11:35:21-04:00April 14th, 2019|Categories: Sermon, The Story of Jesus|Tags: , , , |

“The Story of Jesus (It’s the Story of Us)”

This sermon is based on Luke 22:14-20. SERIES OVERVIEW: She wasn’t the brightest bulb on the tree, but she was trying to understand. She was trying to figure out who Jesus was. She knew he was born on Christmas and that he died on Good Friday and was raised on Easter Sunday.  Her problem was that she forgot that there were 30 years between those first two events! But she is not alone. While none of us would ever make that chronological mistake and have a five-month old savior going to the cross, we often overlook what Jesus was doing in his life. We know why he was born (incarnation). We know why he died (atonement). We know why he rose again (exaltation). We even know why he will return (restoration). But ask someone why Jesus lived, and they may stumble to find a concise answer.  For many of us,

“The Story of Jesus (It Is a Story of Compassion)”

This sermon is based on Matthew 25:31-40. SERIES OVERVIEW: She wasn’t the brightest bulb on the tree, but she was trying to understand. She was trying to figure out who Jesus was. She knew he was born on Christmas and that he died on Good Friday and was raised on Easter Sunday.  Her problem was that she forgot that there were 30 years between those first two events! But she is not alone. While none of us would ever make that chronological mistake and have a five-month old savior going to the cross, we often overlook what Jesus was doing in his life. We know why he was born (incarnation). We know why he died (atonement). We know why he rose again (exaltation). We even know why he will return (restoration). But ask someone why Jesus lived, and they may stumble to find a concise answer.  For many of us,

By |2019-04-06T21:00:30-04:00March 31st, 2019|Categories: Sermon, The Story of Jesus|Tags: , , , , |

“The Story of Jesus (It Is the Story of Israel, Part Two)”

This sermon is based on Matthew 4:1-11. SERIES OVERVIEW: She wasn’t the brightest bulb on the tree, but she was trying to understand. She was trying to figure out who Jesus was. She knew he was born on Christmas and that he died on Good Friday and was raised on Easter Sunday.  Her problem was that she forgot that there were 30 years between those first two events! But she is not alone. While none of us would ever make that chronological mistake and have a five-month old savior going to the cross, we often overlook what Jesus was doing in his life. We know why he was born (incarnation). We know why he died (atonement). We know why he rose again (exaltation). We even know why he will return (restoration). But ask someone why Jesus lived, and they may stumble to find a concise answer.  For many of us,

By |2019-03-27T15:41:22-04:00March 24th, 2019|Categories: Sermon, The Story of Jesus|Tags: , , , |

“The Story of Jesus (It Is Not What Anyone Thought)”

This sermon is based on Mark 8:27-31. SERIES OVERVIEW: She wasn’t the brightest bulb on the tree, but she was trying to understand. She was trying to figure out who Jesus was. She knew he was born on Christmas and that he died on Good Friday and was raised on Easter Sunday.  Her problem was that she forgot that there were 30 years between those first two events! But she is not alone. While none of us would ever make that chronological mistake and have a five-month old savior going to the cross, we often overlook what Jesus was doing in his life. We know why he was born (incarnation). We know why he died (atonement). We know why he rose again (exaltation). We even know why he will return (restoration). But ask someone why Jesus lived, and they may stumble to find a concise answer.  For many of us,

By |2019-03-27T15:42:44-04:00March 17th, 2019|Categories: Sermon, The Story of Jesus|Tags: , , , |

“The Story of Jesus (It May Be Longer than You Think)”

This sermon is based on Mark 8:27-31. SERIES OVERVIEW: She wasn’t the brightest bulb on the tree, but she was trying to understand. She was trying to figure out who Jesus was. She knew he was born on Christmas and that he died on Good Friday and was raised on Easter Sunday.  Her problem was that she forgot that there were 30 years between those first two events! But she is not alone. While none of us would ever make that chronological mistake and have a five-month old savior going to the cross, we often overlook what Jesus was doing in his life. We know why he was born (incarnation). We know why he died (atonement). We know why he rose again (exaltation). We even know why he will return (restoration). But ask someone why Jesus lived, and they may stumble to find a concise answer.  For many of us,

By |2019-03-13T19:06:18-04:00March 10th, 2019|Categories: Sermon, The Story of Jesus|Tags: , , , |

The Cry of Despair

This sermon is based on Psalm 88:1-8, 14-18. SERIES OVERVIEW: Wisdom teaches us that we are composed of three parts: intellect, emotion and will. But we are not so happy about that. We like to think that thinking is king and that acting is behaving in accordance with something we think.  Worse, we feel that emotions are so. . . emotional.   And while we like the good emotions (love, joy, hope, etc.), we don’t know what to do with the bad ones (anger, guilt, fear, etc.), except to say they are bad and we should not have them.  But what if our emotions (both the good and the bad) are a window into our own souls? And what if our emotions are often the vehicle God chooses to use so that we can truly find him? And what if following Jesus well has a lot to do with us following

The Cry of Anger

This sermon is based on Psalm 37:7-13. SERIES OVERVIEW: Wisdom teaches us that we are composed of three parts: intellect, emotion and will. But we are not so happy about that. We like to think that thinking is king and that acting is behaving in accordance with something we think.  Worse, we feel that emotions are so. . . emotional.   And while we like the good emotions (love, joy, hope, etc.), we don’t know what to do with the bad ones (anger, guilt, fear, etc.), except to say they are bad and we should not have them.  But what if our emotions (both the good and the bad) are a window into our own souls? And what if our emotions are often the vehicle God chooses to use so that we can truly find him? And what if following Jesus well has a lot to do with us following our

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