The Temple

This sermon is based on John 2:13-22. SERIES OVERVIEW:       Years ago, "The Who" asked, “Who are you?” (and if you are not right now chanting, “Who, who, who, who?” in response, you are either way too young or way too humdrum).  It’s a fun song, but more importantly, it’s a great question.  It was also an important question 2000 years ago as the people tried to figure out who Jesus was.  But how Jesus answered the “who” question is interesting. He didn’t lecture us to correct our misunderstandings.       Instead, he gave us images and metaphors and word pictures.  He called himself the “Bread of Life.”  He wore the criticism, “friend of sinners,” as a badge of honor.  He proclaimed to all that he was “the good shepherd.”  He declared that he was the Messiah, and he announced that he was Israel’s king. Here’s the point: all of these images (and the dozens

Israel Revisited

This sermon is based on Matthew 4:1-11. SERIES OVERVIEW:       Years ago, "The Who" asked, “Who are you?” (and if you are not right now chanting, “Who, who, who, who?” in response, you are either way too young or way too humdrum).  It’s a fun song, but more importantly, it’s a great question.  It was also an important question 2000 years ago as the people tried to figure out who Jesus was.  But how Jesus answered the “who” question is interesting. He didn’t lecture us to correct our misunderstandings.       Instead, he gave us images and metaphors and word pictures.  He called himself the “Bread of Life.”  He wore the criticism, “friend of sinners,” as a badge of honor.  He proclaimed to all that he was “the good shepherd.”  He declared that he was the Messiah, and he announced that he was Israel’s king. Here’s the point: all of these images (and the dozens

By | 2018-05-02T11:33:57+00:00 April 29th, 2018|Categories: Sermon, The "Who" Question|Tags: , , , |

A Friend, a Judge, and a Savior

This sermon is based on Matthew 11:16-22. SERIES OVERVIEW:       Years ago, "The Who" asked, “Who are you?” (and if you are not right now chanting, “Who, who, who, who?” in response, you are either way too young or way too humdrum).  It’s a fun song, but more importantly, it’s a great question.  It was also an important question 2000 years ago as the people tried to figure out who Jesus was.  But how Jesus answered the “who” question is interesting. He didn’t lecture us to correct our misunderstandings.       Instead, he gave us images and metaphors and word pictures.  He called himself the “Bread of Life.”  He wore the criticism, “friend of sinners,” as a badge of honor.  He proclaimed to all that he was “the good shepherd.”  He declared that he was the Messiah, and he announced that he was Israel’s king. Here’s the point: all of these images (and the dozens

By | 2018-04-28T21:03:59+00:00 April 22nd, 2018|Categories: Sermon, The "Who" Question|Tags: , , |

Christ Jesus

This sermon is based on Matthew 16:13-20. SERIES OVERVIEW:       Years ago, "The Who" asked, “Who are you?” (and if you are not right now chanting, “Who, who, who, who?” in response, you are either way too young or way too humdrum).  It’s a fun song, but more importantly, it’s a great question.  It was also an important question 2000 years ago as the people tried to figure out who Jesus was.  But how Jesus answered the “who” question is interesting. He didn’t lecture us to correct our misunderstandings.       Instead, he gave us images and metaphors and word pictures.  He called himself the “Bread of Life.”  He wore the criticism, “friend of sinners,” as a badge of honor.  He proclaimed to all that he was “the good shepherd.”  He declared that he was the Messiah, and he announced that he was Israel’s king. Here’s the point: all of these images (and the dozens

By | 2018-04-28T21:00:26+00:00 April 15th, 2018|Categories: Sermon, The "Who" Question|Tags: , , |

The End of the Path

RESURRECTION SUNDAY: This sermon is based on Philippians 2:6-11. Series Overview: Choice: it is what makes life rich and interesting. YOU get to choose things that will determine your tomorrows.   But it is even more than that: “We are our choices” (Jean-Paul Sartre). Now sometimes, our choices are limited (sometimes by finances, sometimes by personal restrictions, and sometimes by a host of odd coincidences).  But think about what we could achieve if we had infinite possibilities, possibilities that we could actually materialize?  We could do almost anything and be almost anything. Now before we start claiming untapped and unlimited potential, let us change the focus from us to God.  God, being God, really could choose any path and actualize any possibility; but when it came to the incarnation, God chose the path of suffering, of rejection, of abandonment and of sorrow.   As hard as it is to grasp, Good Friday was always God’s first choice.  In this Lenten season, we want to consider the path Jesus

The Path into Jerusalem

This sermon is based on Luke 19:37-44. Series Overview: Choice: it is what makes life rich and interesting. YOU get to choose things that will determine your tomorrows.   But it is even more than that: “We are our choices” (Jean-Paul Sartre). Now sometimes, our choices are limited (sometimes by finances, sometimes by personal restrictions, and sometimes by a host of odd coincidences).  But think about what we could achieve if we had infinite possibilities, possibilities that we could actually materialize?  We could do almost anything and be almost anything. Now before we start claiming untapped and unlimited potential, let us change the focus from us to God.  God, being God, really could choose any path and actualize any possibility; but when it came to the incarnation, God chose the path of suffering, of rejection, of abandonment and of sorrow.   As hard as it is to grasp, Good Friday was always God’s first choice.  In this Lenten season, we want to consider the path Jesus chose to

The Path Jesus Chose

This sermon is based on Mark 6:47-52. Series Overview: Choice: it is what makes life rich and interesting. YOU get to choose things that will determine your tomorrows.   But it is even more than that: “We are our choices” (Jean-Paul Sartre). Now sometimes, our choices are limited (sometimes by finances, sometimes by personal restrictions, and sometimes by a host of odd coincidences).  But think about what we could achieve if we had infinite possibilities, possibilities that we could actually materialize?  We could do almost anything and be almost anything. Now before we start claiming untapped and unlimited potential, let us change the focus from us to God.  God, being God, really could choose any path and actualize any possibility; but when it came to the incarnation, God chose the path of suffering, of rejection, of abandonment and of sorrow.   As hard as it is to grasp, Good Friday was always God’s first choice.  In this Lenten season, we want to consider the path Jesus chose to

By | 2018-03-24T23:30:44+00:00 March 18th, 2018|Categories: Sermon, The Path Jesus Chose|Tags: , , , , |

A Way of Weakness, Part 3

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 13:5-6. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By | 2018-03-17T23:18:50+00:00 March 11th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

A Way of Weakness, Part 2

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 12:9-10. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By | 2018-03-10T22:26:16+00:00 March 4th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

A Way of Weakness, Part 1

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 12:1-10. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By | 2018-02-27T23:19:35+00:00 February 25th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

A Cross-Shaped Faith

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 11:21-33. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By | 2018-02-25T00:17:34+00:00 February 18th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

A Culture-Shaped Faith, Part 2

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 11:5-15. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By | 2018-02-24T15:16:55+00:00 February 11th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

A Culture-Shaped Faith, Part 1

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 11:1-4. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By | 2018-02-24T15:18:33+00:00 February 4th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

Proper Boasting

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 10:12-18. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By | 2018-02-03T11:11:36+00:00 January 28th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

A New Community

We are grateful to the Lord that Dan Passerelli, pastor to young adults/young families at Chapelgate Presbyterian Church, shared God's Word with us today while Dane Lewis is home recovering from his wrist surgery. This sermon is based on Ephesians 2:11-22 and is titled, "A New Community."

By | 2018-01-27T22:19:57+00:00 January 21st, 2018|Categories: Sermon|Tags: , |

Intruder Alert

This sermon is based on 2 Corinthians 10:1-13. Series Overview: If I was asked for a list of ten things we don’t have enough of, my top three answers would be faith, hope and love, followed by another round of faith, hope and love (and then in seventh place, painless surgeries or doctors with the gift of instant healing). But one of the strengths of Paul’s faith was that it was saturated in weakness. Even when Paul was attacked, as he was in 2 Corinthians, he responded with an incredible weakness and humility. It was what made his faith so unbelievably powerful.  Apparently, there is great strength in being weak. Join us as we explore how weakness ought to shape our faith as we look at the most autobiographical section of all of Paul’s letters, 2 Corinthians 10-13. It’s guaranteed to give you a weaker faith than ever before!

By | 2018-01-17T19:10:05+00:00 January 14th, 2018|Categories: A Weak Faith, Sermon|Tags: , , |

The Hope of Dwelling

This sermon is based on John 1:14-18. Series Overview: Christmasy -- it’s a word. It means “typical of Christmas” or “a special Christmas mood.” Christmas is a word, but it seems to have lost its meaning of late. Once, it meant a day of worship to celebrate God’s redemption of the world through the incarnation of Jesus, the Son. Now, it simply denotes a winter holiday filled with food, family, the airing of grievances and the giving of gifts (but not necessarily in that order). That’s why, this year, I’m choosing to use the word Christmasy more, but I want to mispronounce it. I like “Christmas –why” over “Christmas-ee” because it asks the right question: “Why is there a Christmas?” That’s the question we want to explore this Advent season. And it’s a funny thing, when you are all “Christmas-why,” you end up being all Christmasy because you will find the true meaning of Christmas.

By | 2018-01-17T16:20:48+00:00 December 31st, 2017|Categories: ChristmasY, Sermon|Tags: , , , |

The Hope of Christmas

This sermon is based on Isaiah 9:2-7. Series Overview: Christmasy -- it’s a word. It means “typical of Christmas” or “a special Christmas mood.” Christmas is a word, but it seems to have lost its meaning of late. Once, it meant a day of worship to celebrate God’s redemption of the world through the incarnation of Jesus, the Son. Now, it simply denotes a winter holiday filled with food, family, the airing of grievances and the giving of gifts (but not necessarily in that order). That’s why, this year, I’m choosing to use the word Christmasy more, but I want to mispronounce it. I like “Christmas –why” over “Christmas-ee” because it asks the right question: “Why is there a Christmas?” That’s the question we want to explore this Advent season. And it’s a funny thing, when you are all “Christmas-why,” you end up being all Christmasy because you will find the true meaning of Christmas.

By | 2018-01-17T16:18:40+00:00 December 24th, 2017|Categories: ChristmasY, Sermon|Tags: , , , |
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